But I don't think those things matter." The song follows a traditional verse-chorus-verse structure; when Kiedis begins singing, Frusciante jumps into a funk-oriented riff that is repeated throughout the verse while Flea plays a complex bass-line that makes use of virtually the entire fretboard.

Everything was the same, boring, homogenized, contrived shit." He and Flea met with Sednaoui to talk about the video, for which the director proposed a "very desolated [and] very graphic landscape," while heavily focusing on the band members with little to no outside influence.

It was decided that the video would be filmed in black and white while Sednaoui took the idea of painting the band members with silver acrylic from previous photo shoots he had done.

Every time you empty your vessel of that energy, fresh new energy comes flooding in." During the verses, Kiedis departs from the idea of unselfishness and sings about a variety of topics including long-time friend River Phoenix, musician Bob Marley and various sexual themes including fertility and lust."Give It Away" makes use of far drier production than previous Red Hot Chili Peppers material by removing reverb and guitar layering.

Producer Rick Rubin disavowed walls of sound and layering for simpler, more concise guitar and bass progressions.

The hook is irresistible and the message, about 'material excess,' is delivered simply and straightforwardly." Steve Huey of Allmusic felt the song was enhanced by Kiedis' lyrics, which were "a free-associative mixture of positive vibes, tributes to musical heroes, and free love, and their literal meaning was often as difficult to understand as Kiedis' nasal, staccato enunciation.

But that distinctive vocal style helped make the most comprehensible lines even catchier and more memorable, greatly enhancing the song's appeal." He continued by praising the track's music, "John Frusciante's guitar should not be underappreciated either; his noisy, scratchy funk-rock work add[s] depth and texture to the powerhouse rhythm section of Flea and Chad Smith." Since the song's release, it has become a notable factor in the Red Hot Chili Peppers' success and has won a variety of accolades.

Kiedis wanted the video to be visually distinct and readily identifiable but disliked much of the material Warner Bros.

sent for him to choose from: "I started viewing reels and reels and reels of video directors but nothing looked good to me.

Instead of giving material possessions away and being free thinking, the vocalist believed one must take what one wants, as no one else will provide.