Of these, 91% of the firearm transactions and 100% of the explosives transactions were allowed.[110] * Under federal law, individuals who have been convicted of a felony offense that would typically prohibit them from possessing firearms can lawfully possess firearms if their civil rights are restored by the requisite government entities.[111] * Using fake driver’s licenses bearing fictitious names, investigators with the Government Accountability Office had a 100% success rate buying firearms in five states that met the minimum requirements of the federal background check system.[113] [114] A 2001 report of this investigation states that the federal background check system “does not positively identify purchasers of firearms,” and thus, people using fake IDs are not flagged by the system.[115] provide a venue for the sale and exchange of firearms by federal firearms licensees (FFLs). Such shows also are a venue for private sellers who buy and sell firearms for their personal collections or as a hobby.

* The law requires that licensees be at least 21 years of age (or 18 years of age if a member or veteran of the U. armed forces), have clean criminal/mental health records, and complete a handgun proficiency course and examination.[139] * This law requires that concealed carry licensees be at least 18 years of age (or 21 years of age if purchasing a handgun from a licensed dealer), have clean criminal/mental health records, and complete a pistol safety course.[144] [145] [146] , the 2008 Supreme Court ruling striking down Washington’s D.

C.’s handgun ban, Justice Stephen Breyer authored a dissenting opinion that was joined by Justices John Paul Stevens, David Souter, and Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

This law also required that firearm certificates specify the identification numbers (“if known”) of all firearms and shotguns owned by the applicant.[50] * In 1997, Britain passed a law requiring civilians to surrender almost all privately owned handguns to the police.

More than 162,000 handguns and 1.5 million pounds of ammunition were “compulsorily surrendered” by February 1998.

Of these, approximately 1.2 million or 0.6% were denied.[92] * States may prosecute cases that the federal government does not.

In 2010, Pennsylvania convicted more than 100 individuals for state law violations arising out of firearm background check denials.[96] * If an FBI background check takes longer than three days, the gun sale is approved by default.[97] This is how Dylann Roof, the killer of nine people at a black church in South Carolina in 2015,[98] was able to buy a gun despite having a police record that included drug possession.[99] * In 2010, the FBI referred 2,000 to 3,000 cases of post-gun sale denials to the U. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) for further action.[100] The ATF retrieved guns in 1,157 cases.[101] * According to a 2014 Government Accountability Office report, the ATF “does not have information readily available to systematically track the timeliness and outcomes—such as if a firearm is retrieved—of delayed denial investigations.”[102] The Department prioritizes prosecuting prohibited persons who actually obtain guns—people who have gotten around the background check system and acquired weapons—illegally rather than those who attempted to purchase a firearm through the background check system but were unsuccessful.[103] * According to federal agents interviewed in a 2004 U. Justice Department investigation, the “vast majority” of denials under the federal background check system are issued to people who are not “a danger to the public because the prohibiting factors are often minor or based on incidents that occurred many years in the past.” As examples of such, agents stated that denials have been issued for: * Between February 2004 and December 2014, 2,233 firearm and three explosives background checks for people on terrorist watch lists were processed through the federal background check system.

Likewise, data associated with the effects of gun control laws in various geographical areas represent random, demographically diverse places in which such data is available.

Many aspects of the gun control issue are best measured and sometimes can only be measured through surveys,[1] but the accuracy of such surveys depends upon respondents providing truthful answers to questions that are sometimes controversial and potentially incriminating.[2] Thus, Just Facts uses this data critically, citing the best-designed surveys we find, detailing their inner workings in our footnotes, and using the most cautious plausible interpretations of the results.

This is roughly 27 times lower than the CDC’s 1994 estimate for the number of times Americans use guns to frighten away intruders who are breaking into their homes.[157] * The President of the United States appoints justices to the Supreme Court. He argued that this was implausible because, based on the country’s population at the time, a federal standing army couldn’t field more than 25,000–30,000 men.