In a report unrelated to Edward Snowden, the French newspaper Le Monde revealed that France's DGSE was also undertaking mass surveillance, which it described as "illegal and outside any serious control".Documents leaked by Edward Snowden that were seen by Süddeutsche Zeitung (SZ) and Norddeutscher Rundfunk revealed that several telecom operators have played a key role in helping the British intelligence agency Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) tap into worldwide fiber-optic communications.According to the magazine the NSA stores data from around half a billion communications connections in Germany each month.

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NSA had access to emails because "Prism collects this data prior to encryption." In addition, Microsoft worked with the FBI to enable the NSA to gain access to its cloud storage service Sky Drive. citizens of wrongdoing, the CIA's National Counterterrorism Center is allowed to examine federal government files for possible criminal behavior.

An internal NSA document dating from August 3, 2012 described the PRISM surveillance program as a "team sport". Previously the NTC was barred to do so, unless a person was a terror suspect or related to an investigation.

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These media reports have shed light on the implications of several secret treaties signed by members of the UKUSA community in their efforts to implement global surveillance. The extent to which the media reports have responsibly informed the public is disputed.

federal documents, Snowden's cache reportedly contains thousands of Australian, British and Canadian intelligence files that he had accessed via the exclusive "Five Eyes" network.

For example, Der Spiegel revealed how the German Bundesnachrichtendienst (BND) transfers "massive amounts of intercepted data to the NSA", while Swedish Television revealed the National Defence Radio Establishment (FRA) provided the NSA with data from its cable collection, under a secret treaty signed in 1954 for bilateral cooperation on surveillance. In January 2014, Obama said that "the sensational way in which these disclosures have come out has often shed more heat than light" "Taken together, the revelations have brought to light a global surveillance system that cast off many of its historical restraints after the attacks of Sept. Secret legal authorities empowered the NSA to sweep in the telephone, Internet and location records of whole populations." The NSA was also getting data directly from telecommunications companies codenamed Artifice, Lithium, Serenade, Steel Knight, and X.

According to the SZ, GCHQ has access to the majority of internet and telephone communications flowing throughout Europe, can listen to phone calls, read emails and text messages, see which websites internet users from all around the world are visiting.

It can also retain and analyse nearly the entire European internet traffic.

For example, in December 2013, the NSA gathered on an average day metadata from some 15 million telephone connections and 10 million Internet datasets. government made as part of its UPSTREAM data collection program deals with companies to ensure that it had access to and hence the capability to surveil undersea fiber-optic cables which deliver e-mails, Web pages, other electronic communications and phone calls from one continent to another at the speed of light.

The NSA also monitored the European Commission in Brussels and monitored EU diplomatic Facilities in Washington and at the United Nations by placing bugs in offices as well as infiltrating computer networks. The Foreign Affairs Directorate (FAD) of the NSA is responsible for these partnerships, which, according to Snowden, are organized such that foreign governments can "insulate their political leaders" from public outrage in the event that these global surveillance partnerships are leaked.

According to The Wall Street Journal, the Verizon order is part of a controversial data program, which seeks to stockpile records on all calls made in the U.