Listed below are the African American National Historic Landmarks by state, as certified by the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places, as well as some state built in 1926 in the African American working class neighborhood of Collegeville.

This historically black neighborhood was originally founded in 1866 by former slaves.

Jim Crow laws from 18 spurred the growth of Lincolnville's black owned and operated commercial enterprises, and in 1964 its politicized community institutions became the sites and bases from which many Civil Rights Movment marches began.

Jacksonville: American Beach Historic District American Beach near Jacksonville, Florida, was founded in 1935 by the Afro-American Life Insurance Company of Jacksonville as an oceanfront resort for African Americans.

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2002.

Newark: Iron Hill School This school is one of more than 80 schools for African-American children built between 19 as part of philanthropist Pierre Samuel du Pont's "Delaware experiment." Though small and modest, these school buildings incorporated the latest design concepts in Progressive era education. After the Civil War, many African Americans migrated to Washington and came to live in the alley dwellings of Blagden Alley and Naylor Court, among others. Senator Charles Sumner, a major figure in the fight for abolition of slavery and the establishment of equal rights for African Americans, it was one of the first public school buildings erected for the education of Washington's black community.

Wilmington: Howard High School This is one of the schools directly associated with the landmark U. They were small and poorly constructed buildings, mainly of wood and brick. Since its dedication in 1872, the School's history encompasses the growing educational opportunities available for the District of Columbia's African Americans. Martin Luther King, Jr., stands in the "National Mall" in Washington, D. The monument, opened in August 2011, commorates King's fight for civil rights and the year that the 1964 Civil Rights Act became law.

The most renowned of these figures was Frederick Douglass.

Author, philosopher, theologian, and educator Howard Thurman spent most of his childhood in this late 19th-century house.

Howard University is nationally significant as the setting for the legal establishment of racially desegregated public education.