Like Cory we spend all of our vacations visiting family on the other side of the pond and in Europe and I wouldn’t have it any other way.We would like the girls to have both passports which will give them the opportunity to be able to choose where they want to attend university and live. Reply A family that shares two cultures, two languages and two lifestyles is just so rich!Reply I married a Domincan because of the first and second reasons on the list: he was the only one who offered me “unconditional friendship” before it evolved into love, and I never did things the easy way anyhow. I am Italian American and only learned the surface aspects of the culture, such as food. Later back in the States, wish I could remember all the funny things my husband said. He pointed to the growing pile of scrap paper and said, “You are creating a fire hydrant! For my son and I it was like having our own secret language.

Joseph’s Day is now my favorite church celebration because I get to switch back and forth between Spanish and Italian at the table. Ramon describes himself as “media lengua,” which means he can’t roll “r”s in words like “arroz” (rice) or “perro” (dog). Reply In Hawaii, they’re called “hapa.” In Hong Kong, they’re “Wan Hyut” or just “Mixy”. I’m caucasian, American, and my husband is Chinese. I visited Seattle and Vancouver a few years ago with my son, both of us for sight-seeing, him for hiking, me for searching for Chinese music in both China towns. I’ve always collected a lot of it, my favorite singer being Fei-Yu-Ching (Qing-alternate sp). I have a great excuse for not moving back to the U. I have been fighting for years to be taken seriously as a multiculturalist because I have married into another culture.

I, on the other hand, can roll the “r” and no one ever guesses where I am originally from. 9) Chinese food is just HEALTHIER than most western food I am familiar with… Here, in America, they’re multi-racial…or just Eurasian. But it does weird my mother out a little bit to see an exact copy of her own green eyes…looking out of almond shaped eyes on a tan little face! I also love erhu music and there are many other singers I like. My husband was born in Manchuria (dung bei), moved to Shanghai, then to Taiwan when he was 16 where his father was a senator which is a story in itself since he did not belong to the party and refused to join. This should be right up there with other reasons for accessing a culture, such as being born on a military base abroad, having parents in the Peace Corps or being the child of immigrants.

hat with all of the fantastic American men around, what made me choose to tie the knot with a foreigner? I should say that when my husband and I met we were not enamored with each other’s cultures!

How about this fun, tongue-in-cheek, stereotypical rundown of some of my favorites (ignoring, of course, all of the challenges that go into an international marriage – you can find those in my post 10 Reasons Why You Should NOT Marry a Foreigner)? I went to Ireland to hang out with the Irish, not some German guy!

Who would want to have a simple, normal, easy relationship? After all of that, there was no way I could let him go, ever!

it was all worth it and made our relationship even stronger.

Meeting in Ireland, breaking up in Versaille for an excruciating 10 minutes, meeting the families, being separated for a year to finish college…

And he wanted to hang with the locals, not some American on an Education Abroad Program.

The little things, like the Easter eggs in onion skins, become so very highlighted when seen through each other’s eyes, don’t they! We really enjoyed doing it and I’d love to try it out again… Definitely – political differences count faaaaar more than language and cultural differences!