He also refers in his writings about his travels with a Turkic Amir named Tughral in Sindh (Pakistan across the Indus and Thar), India (especially Somnath, where he encounters Brahmans), and Central Asia (where he meets the survivors of the Mongol invasion in Khwarezm). Tughral later enters service of the wealthy Delhi Sultanate, and Saadi is invited to Delhi and later visits the Vizier of Gujarat.

For twenty years or more, he continued the same schedule of preaching, advising, and learning, honing his sermons to reflect the wisdom and foibles of his people.

Saadi's works reflect upon the lives of ordinary Iranians suffering displacement, agony and conflict during the turbulent times of the Mongol invasion.

Saadi was captured by Crusaders at Acre where he spent seven years as a slave digging trenches outside its fortress.

He was later released after the Mamluks paid ransom for Muslim prisoners being held in Crusader dungeons.

At Khorasan Saadi befriends a Turkic Emir named Tughral.

Saadi joins him and his men on their journey to Sindh where he meets Pir Puttur, a follower of the Persian Sufi grand master Shaikh Usman Marvandvi (1117–1274).

Shiraz, under Atabak Abubakr ibn Sa'd ibn Zangi (1231–60), the Salghurid ruler of Fars, was enjoying an era of relative tranquility.

Saadi was not only welcomed to the city but was shown great respect by the ruler and held to be among the greats of the province.

Saadi Shirazi), was a major Persian poet and literary of the medieval period.