Here’s the exact template I use – complete with budget built in and all: J’s Financial Snapshot.

Irradiation of natural tellurium produces almost entirely I-131 as the only radionuclide with a half-life longer than hours, since most lighter isotopes of tellurium become heavier stable isotopes, or else stable iodine or xenon.

However, the heaviest naturally occurring tellurium nuclide, Te-130 (34% of natural Te) absorbs a neutron to become tellurium-131, which beta-decays with a half-life of 25 minutes, to I-131.

See fission product yield for a comparison with other radioactive fission products.

I-131 is also a major fission product of uranium-233, produced from thorium.

These studies suppose that cancers happen from residual tissue radiation damage caused by the I-131, and should appear mostly years after exposure, long after the I-131 has decayed.

Most I-131 production is from nuclear reactor neutron-irradiation of a natural tellurium target.

If you’re not sure what you should include and what you shouldn’t, just start tracking the parts that are important to you and you can tweak it over time. The good, the bad, and even the most ugly months ;) But we “started from the bottom now we here!

You can also check out this list of Blogger Net Worths I put together on my other site too, which will give you a good idea of how others calculate it (and even more juicier – what *their* net worths are ;)). Nobody cares as much about our money as you do, so always make that #1 priority.

By contrast, other iodine radioisotopes are usually created by far more expensive techniques, starting with reactor radiation of expensive capsules of pressurized xenon gas.

Iodine-131 is also one of the most commonly used gamma-emitting radioactive industrial tracer.

;)) There are a billion ways to track it, but I prefer using a plain ol’ Excel spreadsheet that I manually update at the end of every month.