If you like the look of someone, all you need to do is swipe right on your smartphone (or left if you’re not interested) to get matching.

Like Snapchat, Tinder has a reputation for being all about sexting – which is quickly disproven by using it.

While a recent article detailed all the ways people are using the app for casual sex, the first Tinder date this reporter went on was a perfectly G-rated evening with hot chocolate in a park.

Now, what if you don’t want to spend hours painstakingly customizing a profile? Inspired by the tech industry’s continued failure to invent “the straight Grindr,” in 2011 the writer Anne Friedman came up with a list of suggestions for making a hookup app that would be popular with women. Allow only ladies to search, which would supposedly eliminate the flood of messages that awaits any woman who signals she’s interested in casual sex.

Tinder doesn’t do this exactly, but it found another way to cut down on the creep factor, through what its founders call “the double opt-in”: You can only message someone after you’ve both signaled that you’d be down to talk to the other.

The lack of profiles on Tinder turns out to be its most salient feature.

It means there isn’t a lot to distract you from your mission of swiping through as many suitors as possible, but it also means when you do get a match, attempts at conversation can prove unfruitful.

(Like a pyramid scheme, you get better rewards – in this case, more matches per day – the more friends you have using the app.) Born out of technological necessity (in the early stages, most users only had a few friends-of-friends using the app) this limiting factor goes against the general trend of dating apps – and of the infinite stream of the web itself. Like Tinder, Hinge connects through Facebook, but it takes this connection a step further.

Whether on purpose or not, Hinge has eliminated one of the downsides of online dating, that sense that, in a bottomless ocean, there is always a better, prettier fish to be found. Your only pictures are your Facebook profile pictures.

Then you might need Like many apps, Tinder verifies your identity through Facebook, and you can see how many friends you have in common with each of your prospective matches.

Hinge, which borrows most of its interface from Tinder, takes this one step further – you can see people with whom you share a mutual friend.

The third, born of anecdotal data, is to be one of those users who swipes right on .