The word came into use as a self-description probably before the 7th century.

In Welsh literature, the word Cymry was used throughout the Middle Ages to describe the Welsh, though the older, more generic term Brythoniaid continued to be used to describe any of the Britonnic peoples (including the Welsh) and was the more common literary term until c. Thereafter Cymry prevailed as a reference to the Welsh. 1560 the word was spelt Kymry or Cymry, regardless of whether it referred to the people or their homeland.

Outside Wales, a related form survives as the name Cumbria in North West England, which was once a part of Yr Hen Ogledd.

dating in north wales-90

Rugby union is seen as a symbol of Welsh identity and an expression of national consciousness.

The English words "Wales" and "Welsh" derive from the same Germanic root (singular Walh, plural Walha), which was itself derived from the name of the Celtic tribe known to the Romans as Volcae and which came to refer indiscriminately to all Celts.

The Latinised forms of these names, Cambrian, Cambric and Cambria, survive as lesser-used alternative names for Wales, Welsh and the Welsh people.

Examples include the Cambrian Mountains (which cover much of Wales and gave their name to the Cambrian geological period), the newspaper Cambrian News, and the organisations Cambrian Airways, Cambrian Railways, Cambrian Archaeological Association and the Royal Cambrian Academy of Art.

Distinctive Welsh politics developed in the 19th century.

Welsh Liberalism, exemplified in the early 20th century by Lloyd George, was displaced by the growth of socialism and the Labour Party.

At that time sea levels were much lower than today, and the shallower parts of what is now the North Sea were dry land.

The east coast of present day England and the coasts of present day Denmark, Germany and the Netherlands were connected by the former landmass known as Doggerland, forming the British Peninsula on the European mainland.

Cornwall) and places in Anglo-Saxon territory associated with Celtic Britons (e.g.