Slesvig historian Ulrik Petersen (1656–1735) confirms the presence of such a banner in the cathedral in the early 17th century, and records that it had crumbled away by about 1660.

The size and shape of the civil ensign ("Koffardiflaget") for merchant ships is given in the regulation of June 11, 1748, which says: A red flag with a white cross with no split end. The proportions are thus: 3:1:3 vertically and 3:1:4.5 horizontally.

In 1559, King Frederik II recaptured it during his own Dithmarschen campaign.

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The reason why the kings of Denmark in the 14th century begin displaying the cross banner in their coats of arms is unknown.

Caspar Paludan-Müller (1873) suggested that it may reflect a banner sent by the pope to the Danish king in support of the Baltic countries.

The legend attributing the miraculous origin of the flag to the campaigns of Valdemar II of Denmark (r.

1202–1241) were recorded by Christiern Pedersen and Petrus Olai in the 1520s.

It is obvious that some confusion must have existed regarding the Splitflag.

In 1696 the Admiralty presented the King with a proposal for a standard regulating both size and shape of the Splitflag.

He notes that the flag was in a poor condition when returned.

Contemporary records describing the battle of Hemmingstedt make no reference to the loss of the original Dannebrog, although the capitulation state that all Danish banners lost in 1500 were to be returned.

Several coins, seals and images exist, both foreign and domestic, from the 13th to 15th centuries and even earlier, showing heraldic designs similar to Dannebrog, alongside the royal coat of arms (three blue lions on a golden shield.) There is a record suggesting that the Danish army had a "chief banner" (hoffuitbanner) in the early 16th century.

Such a banner is mentioned in 1570 by Niels Hemmingsøn in the context of a 1520 battle between Danes and Swedes near Uppsala as nearly captured by the Swedes but saved by the heroic actions of the banner-carrier Mogens Gyldenstierne and Peder Skram.

In 1748, a regulation defined the correct lengths of the two last fields in the flag as ​ This regulation is still in effect today and thus the legal proportions of the National flag is today 3:1:3 in width and anywhere between 3:1:4.5 and 3:1:5.25 in length.