And then I am sanity checking that the module was properly installed by listing all the CAU cmdlets.The same cmdlets are included below in text for convenience: To make sure that CAU GUI application was properly installed along with CAU PS cmdlets, you can sanity check that Server Manager is ready to launch CAU, as in the next screen shot.This is the action you choose to start the self-updating configuration process for your failover cluster.

You can then have CAU “connect” to any failover cluster using appropriate administration credentials, and update the cluster on demand For an overview of the scenario, check out the CAU Scenario Overview.

For this blog post, I will focus on the first mode above: Self-Updating.

During an Updating Run, CAU transparently puts each node of the cluster into node maintenance mode, temporarily fails over the “clustered roles” off it to other nodes, installs the updates and any dependent updates on the first node, performs a restart if necessary, brings the node back out of maintenance mode, fails back the original clustered roles back onto the node, and then proceeds to update the next node.

CAU is cluster workload-agnostic, and it works great with Hyper-V, and a number of File Server workloads. Self-Updating: Once configured by you, CAU can run on a cluster node that it is meant to update.

At a high level, there are three things you need to do to get the end-to-end scenario working and operating seamlessly with your existing patching infrastructure such as Windows Server Update Services (WSUS), on a Windows Server 2012 failover cluster: 1.

Install CAU tools on the Windows Server 2012 (or Windows 8 Client) computer that you want to run it from. Configure self-updating on the desired failover cluster 3. Install CAU tools Installation of CAU is very easy: CAU tools are a part of Failover Clustering Tools.

The beauty of self-updating is that it lets you configure your failover cluster to be on “auto pilot” in terms of patching, and once set up, the cluster updates itself on the schedule you have defined in a way that it causes either no impact to service availability, or the least possible – depending on the types of workloads (e.g.

Hyper-V cluster updating experience would be truly continuously available with Live Migration, with zero down time to Hyper-V VM users).

Addressing this was always the #1 ask for Windows Server 2012, during all the discusssions we had with customers in early days of release planning.

Cluster-Aware Updating (CAU) is an exciting new feature that we have added in Windows Server 2012 that addresses precisely this gap.

In previous releases of Windows, the server updating tools (e.g.